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Congressman Kevin McCarthy's Water Resources Development Act of 2010 (WRDA) Authorization Requests

Dec 3, 2009
Press Release

Water Resources Development Act of 2010 (WRDA) Authorization Requests Congressman Kevin McCarthy (CA-22)

(In Alphabetical Order)

Bakersfield Drinking Water System Upgrade Project

Investing in future water safety infrastructure:  McCarthy requested an authorization of $4.8 million for the Bakersfield Drinking Water System Upgrade Project in Bakersfield, California.  This project involves upgrading components within the existing City drinking water system in order to maintain compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Arsenic Rule.  The practical impact of the rule means certain improvements are needed to parts of the existing system, otherwise there is a possibility the City would not be able to access several groundwater supplies containing arsenic levels that are approaching threshold limits in the rule because of lack of filtration ability.  This authorization would help ensure the residents of Bakersfield have access to safe, clean water to drink that continues to meet EPA standards.

Paso Robles Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade Project

Protecting human health and natural resources:  McCarthy requested an authorization of $4.7 million for the Paso Robles Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade project in Paso Robles, California.  This project involves upgrading the existing wastewater treatment facility in the City of Paso Robles to maintain and come into compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) California Toxics Rule (CTR).  The practical impact of the CTR is that Paso Robles needs to reduce toxic pollutants, such as copper, selenium, trihalomethanes, and ammonia, from its wastewater facility discharge, which requires significant upgrades at the current treatment plant.  In addition, the upgrades would result in cleaner discharge from the plant, which in turn helps protect the local aquifer by reducing the potential of contamination.  This authorization would help ensure Paso Robles has the necessary wastewater treatment infrastructure to satisfy the EPA’s California Toxics Rule to protect human health and the environment, as well as recharge groundwater resources in the area.
 
Ridgecrest New Wastewater Treatment Facility Project

Improving water infrastructures for a military base community: McCarthy requested an authorization of $10 million for the Ridgecrest New Wastewater Treatment Facility Project located in Ridgecrest, California.  The project involves the design and construction of a new tertiary wastewater treatment facility.  The City of Ridgecrest serves as a support community to the Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division at China Lake, and receives and treats all of the installation’s wastewater.  This represents one third of the wastewater treated at the existing treatment facility, which currently has limited capacity.  Based on projected growth in the area, due in large part to additional personnel expected at the base, a new treatment plant is needed in order to maintain compliance with various state and Federal environmental regulations.  This authorization would help ensure the City of Ridgecrest has the wastewater infrastructure in order to remain in compliance with Federal and state environmental regulations while continuing to be able to provide critical services for future growth on the community.

Tehachapi Wastewater Treatment Plant Expansion Project

Recharging potable water sources to meet recycled water goals:  McCarthy requested an authorization of $18 million for the Tehachapi Wastewater Treatment Plant Expansion Project located in Tehachapi, California.  Because the City uses its annual groundwater supply, it must purchase water from the California Aqueduct, which is not cost effective nor provides a long-term solution to the community’s need, especially as the City projects future growth and a corresponding increase in water needs.  This project involves upgrading the City’s existing secondary wastewater treatment facility to a tertiary treatment plant and doubling its capacity.  Treated water that is discharged from the plant would be fully recycled-either used to recharge the local aquifer or for other non-potable uses, which would result in a direct gallon for gallon reduction in the City’s need to import water.  In addition, these upgrades would help the City and California meet the recycled water goals set in the Clean Water Act and, subsequently, the California Water Recycling Act.

 

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